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Author Topic: Pastoralists angered by station trespassers  (Read 2040 times)

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Pastoralists angered by station trespassers
« on: January 26, 2015, 07:47:37 PM »
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-01-26/pastoralists-angered-by-station-trespassers/6042734

Fishing gets a mention, but it's the pig hunters get most of the blame.


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Re: Pastoralists angered by station trespassers
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2015, 08:11:21 PM »


Quote
A survey of Cape York land managers has found unauthorised property access to be the biggest natural resource management issue concerning locals.

Townsville based academic, Bob Beasley, has just completed a five year land use study within the Mitchell River Catchment, in Queensland's eastern Gulf region.

More than 80 land managers representing cattle, mining, conservation, intensive agriculture and indigenous interests were surveyed about a range of topics during the project.

Mr Beasley said the results showed graziers and other property managers were growing increasingly worried about trespassers accessing their land.

"Without exception, all of the landholders agreed their main issue was unauthorised vehicle access to their land," he said.

    They're often threatened, a lot of these people have guns and are usually intoxicated
    Bob Beasley, researcher

"People come onto their land with guns, dogs, rubbish, fire without their permission, and they do a lot of damage.

"These are people with metal detectors, hunters, fishers coming into the rivers, including some illegal fishing using fine nets.

"The dogs stir up the cattle and sometimes pull the cattle down, and a lot of pig hunting dogs are lost and then breed in with the local wild dog population.

"Gates are left open or fences cut, tracks are eroded by vehicles passing across the land."

Mr Beasley said the rise of adventure four-wheel-driving on remote leasehold land had been spurred on by people posting videos and images of their activities online.

"There's a lot of videos of people doing extreme four-wheel-driving, where they go into difficult inaccessible areas and use their four-wheel-drives to the maximum of their ability," he said.

"And in doing so, they create new tracks and do a lot of damage, particularly to the river beds.

"These events are posted online, so you can see the evidence both in the field and on the computer.

"The trend is both wet and dry season, but particularly at this time of the year they will be out driving because that's when the challenge comes, crossing quite deep river beds and traversing quite boggy ground.

"These vehicles can get through and extract themselves, but over the coming years these tracks turn into wallows and clay pans which leads to erosion and loss of vegetation."

He said the effect of illegal land access on pastoralists was more than just financial.

"I couldn't put a value on it, but the cost is in the amount of time and stress that it causes," he said.

"When the property owners remonstrate with these illegal campers, they're often threatened, a lot of these people have guns and are usually intoxicated.

"All of the owners know of examples where people have come back later on to light fires, to cut fences, damage gates and sometimes to shoot cattle."

Despite the challenges, Mr Beasley said there were ways to encourage better visitor behaviour on remote stations.

"Some of the pastoralists provide access to campsites and fishing sites on rivers, whereby campers pay a very small fee," he said.

"It's supervised camping, they're encouraged to remove all their rubbish so that they leave the area in the same condition they found it.

"A lot of property owners are going down this road, it both gives them a little bit of income, but also allows people onto their properties legally and with their permission."






Despite the challenges, Mr Beasley said there were ways to encourage better visitor behaviour on remote stations.

"Some of the pastoralists provide access to campsites and fishing sites on rivers, whereby campers pay a very small fee," he said.

"It's supervised camping, they're encouraged to remove all their rubbish so that they leave the area in the same condition they found it.

"A lot of property owners are going down this road, it both gives them a little bit of income, but also allows people onto their properties legally and with their permission."


Well done to those who do this. It is mostly a win win for all.  :Clap)

 

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